In the spotlight

 Kerstin Stendahl appointed Executive Secretary ad interim of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions
Since April 2014, Kerstin has served as Executive Secretary ad interim of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions.

Kerstin joined the Secretariat as Deputy Executive Secretary of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions in November 2012.


Kerstin Stendahl appointed Executive Secretary ad interim of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions

 Kerstin Stendahl appointed Executive Secretary ad interim of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions

Since April 2014, Kerstin has served as Executive Secretary ad interim of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions.

Kerstin joined the Secretariat as Deputy Executive Secretary of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions in November 2012.

Kerstin leads the management of the Secretariat and performs the representational functions for the Secretariat. She is responsible for the operational implementation of the work programmes of the three conventions, overseeing their implementation, and monitoring and reporting on the delivery of the work programmes. Kerstin supervises and directs the work of the branches of the Secretariat, with a view to achieving synergies.

Formerly, Kerstin held the post of Director for international environmental governance at the Ministry of the Environment, Finland. From 2001 to 2006, she served with the Nordic Council of Ministers while based in London as Secretary for the Nordic Genetic Resources Council and helped prepare the Nordic countries for the access and benefit regime under the Convention on Biological Diversity.

Kerstin is a citizen of Finland.

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Announcements

Calendar of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions

 

Introduction of the Visa Information System (VIS).

Swiss visas application procedure

Swiss visas application procedure

On 11 October 2011 the Schengen member states introduced the Visa Information System (VIS). The VIS is used to store the biometric data (10 fingerprints and the facial image) of the Schengen visa applicant. All Swiss embassies and consulates are gradually being connected to the VIS system.

A document in several languages explaining the implementation of the VIS system, registration of biometric data and the rollout timetable for Swiss embassies/consulates connected to the VIS system is available by clicking on the following web link: http://www.bfm.admin.ch/content/bfm/en/home/themen/einreise/einfuehrung_vis.html

The time needed to obtain a visa depends greatly on local circumstances. Please allow sufficient time for processing of the visa application as per the instructions in the following website: http://www.bfm.admin.ch/content/bfm/en/home/themen/einreise/merkblatt_einreise.html

If Switzerland does not have a consular office in your country you might be required to travel to a neighboring country to process your visa. It is therefore highly recommended to enquire directly with a Swiss embassy/consulate in the applicant’s country of residence or in a neighboring country or to check the appropriate website.

Switzerland has implemented necessary measures to facilitate the issuance of visas for official delegates invited to take part in conferences and international meetings with organizations having concluded a headquarters agreement as well as other persons invited in the framework of good offices.

We would like to remind you that it is the responsibility of each participant to obtain the required entry visa to Switzerland. Please note that at the moment of this writing a Schengen visa is required even for transiting through Schengen zone European Countries. More information on visa is available on the Swiss Department of Foreign Affairs at the following link: http://www.eda.admin.ch/eda/en/home/reps.htm

In some exceptional circumstances Switzerland may issue visas with limited territorial validity (LTV). Please check the following website for details on this procedure and the conditions and limitations for a holder of LTV visas: http://www.eda.admin.ch/eda/en/home/topics/intorg/un/unge/gepri/manvis/manvi2.html

Staff members of the Secretariat have new standardized e-mail addresses.

 

Secretariat of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions adopts standardized e-mail addresses

Secretariat of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions adopts standardized e-mail addresses

As of 15 April 2013, each of our staff members have been assigned a new e-mail address in the standard format firstname.lastname@brsmeas.org. This new format applies to all members of the Secretariat, independently of whether staff are hosted by UNEP or FAO.

In addition to this standardized address, the UNEP staff will continue using e-mail addresses in the format firstname.lastname@unep.org and the FAO staff will continue using e-mail address in the FAO format firstname.lastname@fao.org.

The e-mail addresses in the pic.int and pops.int formats will continue to be functional for six months, to facilitate the transition to the new addresses. Rest assured that messages sent to our former addresses will still be delivered.

Mr. Clayton Campanhola, new Director of FAO’s Plant Protection and Production Division, takes over the role as Executive Secretary for the FAO part of the Rotterdam Convention.

 

New Executive Secretary for the FAO part of the Rotterdam Convention

New Executive Secretary for the FAO part of the Rotterdam Convention

Mr. Clayton Campanhola, new Director of FAO’s Plant Protection and Production Division, takes over the role as Executive Secretary for the FAO part of the Rotterdam Convention.

Mr. Clayton Campanhola, former Director of the Brazilian Agency for Industrial Development (ABDI), graduated in Agronomic Engineering, Clayton Campanhola is a Master in Nuclear Energy in Agriculture, and Doctor in Entomology, by the Texas A&M University – USA. He carried out his postdoctoral training at Universidade de Campinas (Unicamp), in the area of Economical Development and Environment.

As a researcher, Campanhola was the scientific coordinator of the Animal Biology Division, in the Biology Institute of São Paulo. He had also been a professor at Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso (UFMT) and has published eight books and more than 80 articles and summaries in scientific publications.

In the Brazilian Enterprise of Research in Agriculture (EMBRAPA), Campanhola had been a researcher in Rural Development and was nominated president of that institution in 2003.

Mr. Clayton Campanhola took up office in the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) on 2 November 2012.

17 participants strengthened their skills at the training session on chairing meetings of all conventions

17 participants strengthened their skills at the training session on chairing meetings of all conventions

Training contributes to gender and regional diversity in conventions’ corps of highly qualified chairpersons

17 participants strengthened their skills at the training session on chairing meetings of all conventions

17 participants strengthened their skills at the training session on chairing meetings of all conventions

Training contributes to gender and regional diversity in conventions’ corps of highly qualified chairpersons

The Pilot training session on chairing meetings of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm (BRS) conventions took place in Glion, Switzerland, from 3 to 5 March 2014. The training was conducted by the Institute of Advanced Studies of the United Nations University in cooperation with the Secretariat. It brought together 17 participants from Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, the Cook Islands, Ecuador, Egypt, Georgia, Indonesia, Japan, Malawi, Poland, the Russian Federation, Senegal, Sudan, and Switzerland.

The participants benefited from experience of former chairs who led various BRS processes, including the conferences of the parties, meetings of subsidiary bodies, contact groups and informal consultations. Through the combination of lectures, case studies, videos and simulation exercises the participants learned firsthand how to effectively chair intergovernmental meetings and guide them toward consensual outcomes.

“The pilot raining extends the conventions’ corps of highly qualified chairpersons, ensuring that we can call upon experienced chairs from all regions, while maintaining gender and regional diversity among them,” said Kerstin Stendahl, BRS Deputy Executive Secretary.

The training session was held through the generous support of the Government of Switzerland.
Resource mobilization for the 2014-15 biennium takes off with concept notes for voluntary financial contributions

Resource mobilization for the 2014-15 biennium takes off with concept notes for voluntary financial contributions

A list of concept notes for voluntary financial contributions for the biennium 2014/15 is now available.  

Resource mobilization for the 2014-15 biennium takes off with concept notes for voluntary financial contributions

Resource mobilization for the 2014-15 biennium takes off with concept notes for voluntary financial contributions

A list of concept notes for voluntary financial contributions for the biennium 2014/15 is now available.

 

Record Funding for the Global Environment

Record Funding for the Global Environment

US$ 4.43 billion pledged for the Global Environment Facility.

Record Funding for the Global Environment

Record Funding for the Global Environment

GENEVA, April 16, 2014— 30 donor countries today pledged US$ 4.43 billion for the Global Environment Facility (GEF) to support developing countries' efforts over the next four years to prevent degradation of the global environment.

"Today's decision is a powerful signal from the global community about the importance of urgently reversing the negative environmental trends in order to ensure a sustainable future for everybody", said Naoko Ishii, CEO and Chairperson of the GEF. "I am extremely encouraged by the broad coalition that has come together behind the belief in GEF's ability to play a critical role in helping achieve this transformation."

The funding will support projects in more than 140 countries to tackle a broad range of threats to the global environment, including climate change, deforestation, land degradation, extinction of species, toxic chemicals and waste, and threats to oceans and freshwater resources. The GEF is the main global mechanism to support developing countries' to take action to fulfill their commitments under the world's major multilateral environmental agreements. In GEF-6, donors agreed to new financing in support of the Minamata convention on Mercury that was signed in 2013, bringing to five the total number global environmental conventions that the GEF serves.

"The Global Environment Facility has gained the confidence of development partners for its strong track record in protecting the global environment and for its sound management of development partner funds," said Joachim von Amsberg, Vice President for Concessional Finance and Global Partnerships in the World Bank Group, which serves as Trustee for the GEF. "The environmental challenges the global community faces are significant, and funding for the GEF-6 program will help put us on a path toward our shared goal of sustainable development."

Donors emphasized GEF's role in supporting innovative and integrated solutions for the global environment. Among a number of innovations contained in GEF-6 is a new Integrated Approaches Pilot aimed at addressing environmental challenges by focusing on some of the underlying drivers of environmental degradation through special focus on for example food security in Africa, sustainable city development and on taking deforestation out of global commodity supply chains—all issues that can only be effectively addressed if broad coalitions of stakeholders across countries and sectors can be brought together around a common action agenda.

“We welcome the more than US$ 4.3 billion pledged by 30 donor countries to address the urgent environmental needs of developing countries, and appreciate the increase in the overall amount of funding accorded to the chemicals and waste focal area announced today,” said Kerstin Stendahl, Executive Secretary ad interim of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions.

“As the principal entity entrusted with the operation of the Financial Mechanism of the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), the GEF plays a catalytic role in leveraging funding from private and public donors for the Convention. We remain confident that the GEF will in the future be able to continue to address the growing financial and technical assistance needs of Parties to the Stockholm Convention, taking into account the increasing number of chemicals listed under the Convention and the growing number of parties it serves.”

“Every dollar pledged to address POPs chemicals must now be put to work as hard as possible to defeat the scourge of persistent organic pollutants,” Ms Stendahl added.

Mexico's Secretary of Finance and Public Credit, Luis Videgaray, who will host an Assembly of the GEF's 183 members in Cancun, Mexico, in May said, "Only by integrating environmental considerations into decision making by governments, private businesses and households can we hope to make a difference in the global environment. The GEF-6 effort gets under way at a critical time, and is a vital platform to help mobilize all stakeholders to play their part."

The GEF-6 program envisions devoting an increased share of resources to lower-income recipient countries. GEF will also further its engagement with the private sector, its work in gender mainstreaming, collaboration with civil society organizations, and increased focus on results and on leveraging other sources of funding for the benefit of the global environment by seeking higher levels of co-financing of its projects.

Underpinning efforts, the GEF is developing a longer-term strategy, GEF2020, which aims to enhance the GEF's impact by focusing its interventions more on the underlying drivers of environmental degradation.

Doris Leuthard, head of the Swiss Federal Department of the Environment, Transport, Energy and Communications that hosted the meeting in Geneva said "We have better scientific evidence that human activity can lead to tipping points with a risk of irreversible and abrupt environmental change. By focusing on the drivers of environmental change and by seeking multiple benefits, the GEF is taking the right approach to turn around the worrying trends in the global environment".

This Press Release is available in Spanish.

About the Global Environment Facility

The Global Environment Facility (GEF) unites 183 countries in partnership with international organizations, civil society organizations (CSOs), and the private sector to address global environmental issues while supporting national sustainable development initiatives. The GEF provides funding for projects related to biodiversity, climate change, international waters, land degradation, the ozone layer, and persistent organic pollutants.

Since 1991, the GEF has achieved a strong track record providing $12.5 billion in grants and leveraging $58 billion in co-financing for over 3,690 projects in over 165 countries. Through its Small Grants Programme (SGP), the GEF has also made more than 16,000 small grants directly to civil society and community based organizations, totaling $653 million.

Contact: Christian Hofer, Senior Communications Officer, GEF,
chofer@thegef.org.

First e-learning tool launched to prevent illegal trade in hazardous chemicals and waste

First e-learning tool launched to prevent illegal trade in hazardous chemicals and waste

INTERPOL and the BRS Secretariat launch e-learning module to help law enforcement officers identify and prevent illegal trade in hazardous chemicals and wastes

First e-learning tool launched to prevent illegal trade in hazardous chemicals and waste

First e-learning tool launched to prevent illegal trade in hazardous chemicals and waste
INTERPOL and the BRS Secretariat launch e-learning module to help law enforcement officers identify and prevent illegal trade in hazardous chemicals and wastes
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Activities

Syndicate
A Brief Historical Perspective on International Progress in the Sound Management of Chemicals and Wastes
Jim Willis guest article published in IISD Chemicals and Wastes Policy & Practice on 28 March 2014.

A Brief Historical Perspective on International Progress in the Sound Management of Chemicals and Wastes

A Brief Historical Perspective on International Progress in the Sound Management of Chemicals and Wastes
Jim Willis guest article published in IISD Chemicals and Wastes Policy & Practice on 28 March 2014.
Gender mainstreaming initiative underway at the Secretariat
The BRS Gender Action Plan provides the blueprint for actions to promote gender mainstreaming.

Gender mainstreaming initiative underway at the Secretariat

Gender mainstreaming initiative underway at the Secretariat
The BRS Gender Action Plan provides the blueprint for actions to promote gender mainstreaming.
United Nations reports on its 2012 greenhouse gas emissions
BRS progress on reducing CO2 emissions shows commitment to improving sustainability performance - 27 February 2014

United Nations reports on its 2012 greenhouse gas emissions

United Nations reports on its 2012 greenhouse gas emissions

The United Nations today released details of its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for 2012 in the 5th annual edition of the publication - Moving Towards a Climate Neutral UN.

The report provides details on the emissions from 64 UN system organizations, covering more than 220,000 staff and hundreds of locations worldwide. Greenhouse gas emissions totaled 1.71 million tonnes CO2eq across the UN system in 2012.

As in previous years, over 50 percent of emissions are from air travel (0.87 million tonnes CO2eq), meaning this remains the biggest challenge to the organization in achieving climate neutrality.

The Secretariat of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm (BRS) is pleased to report on its CO2 emissions for 2012:

  • Total emissions were 462 tonnes CO2eq;
  • Air travel is the main source of CO2 emissions, representing 98% of total emissions. Other emissions are attributed to office operations;
  • Per capita footprint is 7.57 tCO2eq/ staff member, below the UN average of 7.63 tCO2eq/ staff member.

Significant efforts have been made over the last years towards improving BRS sustainability performance, and reducing BRS CO2 emissions. The following achievements should be highlighted:

  • Total BRS GHG emissions have decreased by 29% in 2011 and 50% in 2012 compared to the 2010 levels;
  • Staff travel has decreased by 13%, from 2011 to 2012.
Over the next few years we will make further progress. The Secretariat will take active steps towards becoming climate neutral. CO2 emissions will be offset for the 2012-2013 and 2014-2015 bienniums, through purchasing of carbon units via the UNEP Climate Neutral Strategy.

“Improving our sustainability performance is a commitment we are taking for the long-term as part of the wider process of strengthening synergies between the chemicals and waste conventions” said Jim Willis, Executive Secretary of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions.

The work on sustainability in the BRS Secretariat is a continuous process that encompasses various environmental aspects, e.g. waste management, energy and water, sustainable travel, etc. This work is undertaken by a team of staff volunteers.

For more information on sustainability in the BRS Secretariat, click here.
Chemicals and waste MEAs cross synergies milestones
2013 was marked by a year of achievements for the three conventions

Chemicals and waste MEAs cross synergies milestones

Chemicals and waste MEAs cross synergies milestones

In a milestone of the synergies process between multilateral environmental agreements, the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm conventions held their first ever jointly held ordinary meetings of the parties in April and May 2013 to foster cooperation and collaboration between the conventions.

The conferences of the parties of the three conventions worked in joint contact groups to promote implementation and strengthen the management of harmful substances throughout their life-cycle. The COPs took more than 50 substantive decisions to fortify protection to health and environment offered by the conventions.

 The Parties to the Stockholm Convention agreed to list hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) in Annex A to the Convention with specific exemptions for expanded polystyrene and extruded polystyrene in buildings. HBCD is set to become the 23rd persistent organic pollutant to be listed under the Stockholm Convention. The Parties to the Basel Convention adopted a framework for the environmentally sound management of hazardous wastes and other wastes, and agreed to develop technical guidelines on transboundary movements of electronic and electrical wastes, or e-waste, the fastest growing hazardous waste stream globally.

The Parties to the Rotterdam Convention agreed to add the pesticide Azinphos-methyl and the industrial chemicals PentaBDE, OctaBDE and PFOS to Annex III of the Convention. This triggers an exchange of information between Parties and helps countries make informed decisions about future import and use of the chemicals. The addition of four substances is the largest number to be added to the Convention's prior informed consent procedure by any conference of the parties since the adoption of the Convention in 1998.

Call sounded for development of an international panel on chemicals

On 9 May 2013, over 80 ministers and vice-ministers met in a high level segment to consider the theme “Synergies and the implementation of the chemicals and wastes conventions at the national, regional and global levels” and to share their national experiences. Participants noted that the synergies process was not a time-finite event but a continuing process: synergies meant cost savings and those savings should be channeled into improving implementation at the national level.

Ministers called for the development of an international panel on chemicals integrating scientific expertise from industry, the private sector and academic institutions, similar to the International Panel on Climate Change, which could form the basis for a stronger science-policy interface. Existing models for monitoring networks could be expanded globally. 

The decisions of the joint COPs provide a solid foundation for the next two years of implementation of the three leading global chemicals and wastes instruments.

Strengthening the Conventions' Science-Policy Interface

The first joint meeting of the Rotterdam Convention Chemical Review Committee and the Stockholm Convention Persistent Organic Pollutants Review Committee took place in Rome on 20 October 2013, to promote synergies between the conventions by strengthening their science-policy interface.

Combating illegal traffic gets ENFORCEment boost

Under the Basel Convention, the newly established Environmental Network for Optimizing Regulatory Compliance on Illegal Traffic (ENFORCE) was launched in 2013 to prevent and combat illegal traffic in hazardous and other wastes through better implementation and enforcement of national legislation. 

Secretariat Acts to Promote Sustainability, Green Practices, gender and regional balance

The Secretariat of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions decreased its carbon footprint by 50% from 2010 to 2012, part of its concerted effort towards becoming climate neutral.
The Secretariat's senior management team achieved both gender and regional balance during 2013, with three men and three women currently serving as branch chiefs or as executive officers drawn from across all five major UN regions. A Gender action plan was also adopted.

Zayed International Prize Honours Top Environmentalists
Colombia’s Paula Caballero Gómez is recognized as having been instrumental in the early conceptualization and promotion of Sustainable Development Goals.

Zayed International Prize Honours Top Environmentalists

Zayed International Prize Honours Top Environmentalists
Colombia’s Paula Caballero Gómez is recognized as having been instrumental in the early conceptualization and promotion of Sustainable Development Goals.
Secretariat acts to promote Sustainability and Green Practices
The Secretariat has decreased its carbon footprint by 50% from 2010 to 2012, and takes active steps towards becoming climate neutral.

Secretariat acts to promote Sustainability and Green Practices

Secretariat acts to promote Sustainability and Green Practices
The Secretariat has decreased its carbon footprint by 50% from 2010 to 2012, and takes active steps towards becoming climate neutral.
Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for the New Year 2014
The Secretariat of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions

Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for the New Year 2014

Season's Greetings and Best Wishes for the New Year 2014

From the Secretariat of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions

Season’s Greetings and Best Wishes for the New Year 2013
First joint meeting of the Chemical Review Committee and the POPs Review Committee strengthens scientific synergies
Committees establish intersessional working group to prepare guidance on PIC POPs chemicals.

First joint meeting of the Chemical Review Committee and the POPs Review Committee strengthens scientific synergies

First joint meeting of the Chemical Review Committee and the POPs Review Committee strengthens scientific synergies

Committees establish intersessional working group to prepare guidance on PIC POPs chemicals.

The first joint meeting of the Chemical Review Committee and the POPs Review Committee took place in Rome on 20 October 2013, attended by 75 participants. The Committee exchanged information on their respective mandates and review processes, and discussed ways to strengthen scientific synergies and enhance collaboration and cooperation among the committees.   

The committees established a joint intersessional working group to develop guidance to assist parties to the Rotterdam Convention and the Chemical Review Committee in their work when a chemical under consideration is a POP listed under the Stockholm Convention. The intersessional working group will be co-chaired by Ms. Mirijam Seng (Germany) and Mr. Azhari Abdelbagi (Sudan).

The report of the meeting is available from the joint meeting page.

Training extends conventions’ corps of highly qualified chairpersons
A pilot training on chairing meetings of the Basel, Rotterdam & Stockholm conventions will be offered in Glion, Switzerland, from 3 to 5 March 2014

Training extends conventions’ corps of highly qualified chairpersons

Training extends conventions’ corps of highly qualified chairpersons

Place and Date: Glion, Switzerland, from 3 to 5 March 2014

Background: In order to strengthen the implementation of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm conventions, and build synergies, there is a need to expand the number and diversity of trained, confident and willing chairs for the various meetings of the conventions.  These may include ordinary and extraordinary meetings of the conferences of the Parties, subsidiary bodies and contact and drafting groups as well as other meetings.

While the three conventions have enjoyed good fortune in the past in finding qualified chairs for their meetings, there are challenges in finding willing and experienced chairs from all regions and in maintaining gender and regional diversity among the chairs.

UN chemical experts recommend adding three pesticides to the PIC global watch list
Rotterdam Convention’s Chemical Review Committee held its 9th meeting in Rome from 22 to 24 October 2013, back to back with the joint meeting of the conventions’ scientific review committees

UN chemical experts recommend adding three pesticides to the PIC global watch list

UN chemical experts recommend adding three pesticides to the PIC global watch list

Geneva and Rome, 25 October 2013 –The Chemical Review Committee, the scientific subsidiary body of the Rotterdam Convention, recommended this week that methamidophos (pesticide) and fenthion 640 ULV* (a severely hazardous pesticide formulation) be subject to the Convention’s Prior Informed Consent (PIC) procedure. The Committee also adopted the draft Decision Guidance Document (DGD) for trichlorfon, a pesticide recommended for inclusion in the Committee’s eighth meeting held in March 2012.

The result of the ninth meeting of the Chemical Review Committee meeting is that three new Decision Guidance Documents will be forwarded to the Conference of the Parties in May 2015 for its consideration for inclusion in Annex III to the Convention and be subject to the PIC procedure.

The Prior Informed Consent procedure of the Convention is a key tool for developing countries to take informed and responsible decisions on the import and on the use of chemicals that represent a danger for the environment and for the human health. It enables member governments to alert each other to potential dangers by exchanging information on banned or severely restricted chemicals and to take informed decisions on them.  This provision prevents unwanted trade in the chemicals listed in Annex III of the Convention and constitutes an early warning system.

The Committee reviewed notifications of final regulatory actions taken by parties for five chemicals: cyhexatin, lead arsenate, lead carbonate, methamidophos, pentachlorobenzene, and one severely hazardous pesticide formulation, fenthion 640 ULV.

On four other chemicals – cyhexatin, lead arsenate, lead carbonate and pentachlorobenzene – the Committee agreed that criteria were not met and no further decisions will be taken for these chemicals at the moment.

“This is the second time since the Convention entered into force in 2004 that the Committee has recommended adding a severely hazardous pesticide formulation to the Prior Informed Consent list, using the ‘fast track’ mechanism that ensures developing countries’ rights to know and trade chemicals safely are respected,” said Clayton Campanhola, Executive Secretary of the Rotterdam Convention for the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO).

“Putting these pesticides under the Rotterdam Convention’s PIC procedure would continue to strengthen the hands of governments and support informed decision-making about the import and use of chemicals known to harm human health and the environment,” said Kerstin Stendahl, Deputy Executive Secretary of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions.

The Committee’s recommendations will be sent to the Parties to the Rotterdam Convention for consideration at the seventh meeting of the Conference of the Parties, scheduled to be held from 4 to 15 May 2015 in Geneva.

The tenth meeting of the Chemical Review Committee will be held in Rome, Italy, from 20 to 24 October 2014 followed immediately by the POPs Review Committee of the Stockholm Convention, scheduled for 27 to 31 October 2014.

Note for Editors:

The objective of the Rotterdam Convention on the Prior Informed Consent Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International Trade is to promote shared responsibility and cooperative efforts among Parties in the international trade of certain hazardous chemicals in order to protect human health and the environment from potential harm. The Convention contributes to the environmentally sound use of such chemicals, by facilitating information exchange about their characteristics, by providing for a national decision-making process on their import and export and by disseminating these decisions to Parties.

Together, the Rotterdam, Basel and Stockholm conventions, the three leading global treaties governing hazardous chemicals, pesticide formulations and wastes, can help countries to manage hazardous chemicals throughout their life-cycle:

  • Rotterdam Convention provides early warning on dangerous chemicals and prevents the unwanted international trade on certain chemicals.
  • Stockholm Convention controls and eliminates production and use of  persistent organic pollutants (POPs).
  • Basel Convention limits “toxic trade” in hazardous wastes and ensures proper disposal of wastes.

The Chemical Review Committee is the scientific subsidiary body of the Rotterdam Convention.  The Committee consists of thirty-one scientific experts appointed by the Conference of the Parties to the Rotterdam Convention charged with undertaking scientific review of chemicals proposed for listing.

Trichlorfon is an insecticide used on a number of crops, including fruits and vegetables. The recommendation by the Chemical Review Committee to list trichlorfon in Annex III to the Rotterdam Convention was based on final regulatory actions submitted by Brazil and the European Union.

Fenthion 640 ULV, among wide range use, it is also used for birds control against grain-eating birds. The proposal has been submitted by Chad, which experienced problems for human health caused by the formulation under conditions of use in its territory. The Committee decided at its ninth meeting to recommend listing it in Annex III to the Rotterdam Convention as a Severely Hazardous Pesticide Formulation (SHPF), based on the proposal of Chad.

Methamidiphos is an insecticide used on many crops, it is already present in Annex III to the Convention and subject to the PIC procedure as severely hazardous pesticide formulation (soluble liquid formulations of substance that exceed 600 g active ingredient/L) and it is classified as highly hazardous (I b oral toxicity) by the World Health Organization. The Committee decided at its ninth meeting to recommend listing it in Annex III to the Rotterdam Convention as a pesticide, based on final regulatory actions submitted by Brazil and the European Union.

Contact:

Elisabetta TAGLIATI, Programme Officer, Secretariat of the Rotterdam Convention (FAO), Rome, Tel. +39-06-5705-6420, elisabetta.tagliati@fao.org

Michael S. JONES, Public Information Officer, Secretariat of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions (UNEP), Geneva,  mobile/text message: +41-79-730-4495, michael.jones@brsmeas.org 

For more information, see  www.pic.int

*fenthion (ultra low volume formulations (ULV) at or above 640 g active ingredient/L)

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Upcoming meetings

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Upcoming Webinars

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Recent Meetings

March 2014
Pilot training session on chairing meetings of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm conventions
Glion, Switzerland, 3 - 5 March 2014

Pilot training session on chairing meetings of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm conventions

Glion, Switzerland, 3 - 5 March 2014


Background: In order to strengthen the implementation of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm conventions, and build synergies, there is a need to expand the number and diversity of trained, confident and willing chairs for the various meetings of the conventions.  These may include ordinary and extraordinary meetings of the conferences of the Parties, subsidiary bodies and contact and drafting groups as well as other meetings.

While the three conventions have enjoyed good fortune in the past in finding qualified chairs for their meetings, there are challenges in finding willing and experienced chairs from all regions and in maintaining gender and regional diversity among the chairs.

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February 2014
Chemical and non Chemical Alternatives to Endosulfan
Webinar, 27 February 2014

Chemical and non Chemical Alternatives to Endosulfan

Webinar, 27 February 2014


The webinar aims at: 

  • Raising awareness on the obligations pertaining to endosulfan under the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions 
  • Sharing information available on possible chemical and non chemical alternatives to endosulfan 
  • Presenting Parties to the Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions with a proposed methodology to assess the continued need of endosulfan at national level

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Chemical and non Chemical Alternatives to Endosulfan
Webinar, 25 February 2014

Chemical and non Chemical Alternatives to Endosulfan

Webinar, 25 February 2014


The webinar aims at: 

  • Raising awareness on the obligations pertaining to endosulfan under the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions 
  • Sharing information available on possible chemical and non chemical alternatives to endosulfan 
  • Presenting Parties to the Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions with a proposed methodology to assess the continued need of endosulfan at national level

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Ban Amendment: Becoming a Party to Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions
Webinar, 13 February 2014

Ban Amendment: Becoming a Party to Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions

Webinar, 13 February 2014


The webinar aims to provide information on how to become a Party to multilateral environmental agreements, in particular the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions. This will also cover processes for amendments and protocols to such agreements.

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January 2014
Ban Amendment: Becoming a Party to Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions
Webinar, 21 January 2014

Ban Amendment: Becoming a Party to Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions

Webinar, 21 January 2014


The webinar aims to provide information on how to become a Party to multilateral environmental agreements, in particular the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions. This will also cover processes for amendments and protocols to such agreements.

More